Digital technology and Big Data: ethics, privacy, special considerations Event as iCalendar

18 February 2019

9:30 - 10:30am

Venue: Room 503-126, Grafton Campus

Location: 85 Park Road Grafton

Contact email: s.hetrick@auckland.ac.nz

Megan

Megan Prictor

Dynamic Consent and research data: Empowerment, trust and vulnerability

Megan will discuss issues around informed consent, transparency and trust when conducting research using the health and genomic data of vulnerable populations, especially when the data were originally collected for another purpose. She will outline the legal and practical implications of employing a 'dynamic consent' approach, which may create tensions between participant empowerment and the concerns of researchers. Examples will be drawn from Australia's My Health Record, historical collections of indigenous biomaterials, and contemporary digital mega-studies.

Bio: Dr Megan Prictor is an academic lawyer and Research Fellow at Melbourne Law School, the University of Melbourne, specialising in the legal and governance aspects of emerging health technologies. She is part of the HeLEX@Melbourne research programme and writes on electronic medical records, informed consent, data sharing and privacy.

noor photo

Noor Aljawahiri

Ethical implications of using the IDI database for mental health research

Noor will discuss a scoping review she has undertaken as part of an HRC funded summer student project (supervised by Dr Hiran Thabrew) to explore the ethics of using national datasets such as New Zealand’s Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) (containing administrative and survey data about people and households) and other forms of ‘big data’ for research purposes.

Bio: Noor Aljawahiri is a fourth year medical student at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. She is particularly interested in the fields of Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Obstetrics and Gynecology. She is on the management team at Radio Lollipop, a volunteer organisation at Starship Children’s Hospital.

RSVP

RSVP by Thursday 14 February to Associate Professor Sarah Hetrick, s.hetrick@auckland.ac.nz