The Centre for Mental Health Research


The Second Mental Health and Social Justice Symposium

Keynote speakers


Keynote speakers will include Professor Bernadette McSherry Director of The University of Melbourne’s Social Equity Institute who will give a public address on the first evening of the two-day event. Two further New Zealand based keynotes will also speak during the MH&SJ symposium, including Anne Helm and Associate Professor Hinemoa Elder.

Professor Bernadette McSherry

Professor Bernadette McSherry

 

Professor Bernadette McSherry is the Foundation Director of the Melbourne Social Equity Institute at the University of Melbourne and an Adjunct Professor in the Melbourne Law School and the Faculty of Law, Monash University.

She is an internationally recognised legal academic in the fields of criminal law and mental health law who was appointed an Australian Research Council Federation Fellow in 2007.

Professor McSherry is the sole author of a book on preventive detention and risk assessment for Routledge, New York and has also co-authored four books, edited or co-edited five books and had published over 120 journal articles. She is a legal member of the Victorian Mental Health Tribunal and in 2011, she was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law.

 

Anne Helm

Anne Helm

Anne is a consumer consultant, activist, educator and tireless worker for social justice.  She was awarded for her ‘exceptional contribution to Mental Health Service in Australia or New Zealand’ at the 2013 TheMHs Conference "in recognition of outstanding courage and determination, and powerful advocacy for truth and dignity so that mental health services can move forward with humanity, social justice and effectiveness”.  As a panel member of the Confidential Forum for Former Inpatients of Psychiatric Hospitals established by the Government, she continues to advocate for formal acknowledgement of the Forum report, Te Āiotanga (2007). Anne was a lead speaker at that memorable gathering in June 2014 convened by the Human Rights Commission to discuss the need to progress “a public apology to all formerly institutionalised disabled people, for abuse or mistreatment of any sort suffered by them, while they were resident in institution” (Recommendation 11 from the monitoring report on NZ Human Rights obligations October 2012).

At the age of nineteen, while training as an opera singer, Anne had her first experience as an inpatient at a psychiatric hospital. Over subsequent years of institutionalisation she witnessed and was personally affected by iatrogenic practices of the day. With knowledge of 40 years of mental health service provision, she can critique current practise and believes there is some way to travel to understand person driven wellness, and really explore the right to define one’s own experience, without coercive interruption. She actively campaigns for the eradication of seclusion and has personal experience of the practice in recent years. Anne appears in an educational video “Opening Doors” in which both people who have experienced seclusion and nurses talk about the harm caused by the practice.

Anne is an author on Recovery, Self-Stigma, and her poems filter through her presentation.

At the time of writing this Anne is working part time as consultant to Addiction Services CCDHB, teaches singing, loves swimming, meditation and delights in her family and young grandson. Anne has a Bachelor of Education (Otago), L.T.C.L. (voice) Teaching Diploma.

 

Associate Professor Hinemoa Elder

Associate Professor Hinemoa Elder

Dr. Hinemoa Elder, Associate Professor of Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi, is an internationally recognized leader in child and adolescent psychiatry, indigenous issues pertaining to psychiatry, neuropsychiatry and youth forensic psychiatry. She is currently undertaking a four-year programme funded by Health Research Council of New Zealand Eru Pomare Post Doctoral Fellowship. Hinemoa is one of a very small number of child and adolescent psychiatrists with experience in working with whanau in the context of traumatic brain injury. This includes questioning in what ways western approaches to research and practice work for Maori and methods needed to investigate issues that have salience for Maori. This work also includes maintaining longstanding relationships with all levels of stakeholders related to Maori health and well-being and connections at the complex interface of traumatic brain injury, including areas of youth forensics, policy, service development, education, care and protection, police, courts, judges and primary care.

A doctoral graduate of Massey University in 2012, Hinemoa also holds a postgraduate certificate in forensic psychology from the University of Otago, which she earned in 2012, and a M.B.Ch.B. from The University of Auckland, earned in 1999. She is a Fellow of the Royal Australia and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists and an international member of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry; a Fellow of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists; a deputy member of the Mental Health Review Tribunal; and medical consultant of the IDCCR Act 2003.