School of Population Health


News

  • Nutrition education for early childcare staff key to preventing obesity in preschoolers
    30 June 2016
    Research from the University of Auckland’s School of Population Health has found that managers, teachers and cooks need more training on child nutrition to support obesity prevention efforts that ensure a healthy start to children’s lives.
  • Stronger policies needed to get children active at daycare
    16 May 2016
    Guidelines are needed about screen time for children at daycare, according to new research from the University of Auckland.
  • Growing Up in New Zealand Associate Director becomes Head of Paediatrics
    27 April 2016
    Clinical practice, research, and mentoring all contribute to the professional role of the new head of Paediatrics at the University of Auckland, Associate Professor Cameron Grant who co-leads the Growing Up in New Zealand study.
  • New tool to measure language skills of NZ Samoan and Tongan children
    23 February 2016
    Researchers from Growing Up in New Zealand have developed the first ever Samoan and Tongan language inventories to formally gauge the language skills of New Zealand toddlers speaking Samoan or Tongan as their first language.
  • Dads can help boost child immunisation rates
    11 February 2016
    Aiming immunisation campaigns specifically at fathers-to-be could be a promising new approach to get more New Zealand children immunised on time suggests new research by the Growing Up in New Zealand study.
  • ECE services struggle to promote healthy eating
    04 February 2016
    Most Early Childhood Education services strive to encourage healthy eating among children, but need stronger and more detailed nutrition policies to support change in every day staff and parent behaviours, finds the Kai time in ECE survey.
  • ‘Collecting childhood’ – in two ways
    01 October 2015
    Growing Up in New Zealand and the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa partner for a unique project which collects childhood stories, objects and photos that represent the lives and experiences of children growing up in our country today.
  • 'Starting school' data collection wave launched
    16 September 2015
    With the Growing Up in New Zealand children reaching school age, the study has launched its latest data collection wave to learn more about parents’ and children’s experiences with the move from early childhood education into primary schooling.
  • Warnings about immunisation prove more influential than positive messages
    03 September 2015
    Negative messages about immunisation have a far greater impact on parents’ decision to delay vaccinations than encouraging information has on vaccinating children on time, reveals a new policy brief by Growing Up in New Zealand.
  • Alcohol and Pregnancy - Understanding the New Zealand context
    28 August 2015
    It has been established that exposure to alcohol can be harmful to the unborn child. Yet about one in five mothers-to-be continue to consume alcohol, according to Growing Up in New Zealand data.
  • One in eight pregnant women affected by depression
    24 August 2015
    One in eight New Zealand women suffer from depression symptoms while pregnant, with Pacific and Asian women twice as likely to be affected, reveals new research from Growing Up in New Zealand.
  • Lead maternity carer system working for most New Zealand mothers
    04 August 2015
    Two decades after New Zealand introduced a choice-based model of primary maternity care, almost all mothers-to-be enrol with a carer early in their pregnancy and most are happy with the choice of carers available, suggests new research from Growing Up in New Zealand.
  • New generation of New Zealand children are helping to keep te reo Māori alive
    27 July 2015
    The use of te reo Māori is on the rise. More parents are speaking te reo to their infants, in comparison to their own childhood. The number of toddlers of Māori descent who understand te reo has also increased. This information is revealed in a new policy brief from Growing Up in New Zealand.
  • Growing Up study suggests low social service use among vulnerable children
    24 July 2015
    Only one in five families whose toddlers were considered most at risk of vulnerability from birth accessed social support services in their first 1000 days of life, according to a new report on early childhood vulnerability, released today by the Growing Up in New Zealand study.
  • Policy Brief: Employment and parental leave around the time of birth
    09 June 2015
    This policy brief from Growing Up in New Zealand describes the parental leave experience of the parents in the longitudinal study, particularly focusing on leave anticipated and taken around the time their babies were born.
  • Pre-school data collection wave completed
    26 March 2015
    We are proud to announce that the Growing Up in New Zealand pre-school (54-months) data collection wave was officially concluded in the field earlier this month.
  • High rate of Strep bacteria bugging Kiwi kids
    13 March 2015
    Over half of healthy New Zealand pre-school children are carriers of Staphylococcus aureus, and one in six hosts Streptococcus pyogenes in their nostrils, throat or crook of the arm, according to new research from Growing Up in New Zealand. The results are the first to show how common it is for preschool-aged children in New Zealand, who showed no signs of illness, to have these two bacteria present on their body.
  • One step closer to unravelling child poverty
    24 February 2015
    More than half of New Zealand mothers experience some level of hardship between late pregnancy and when their child is 9 months old and many parents have to cope with a drop in family income after having children. These are two of the results from a new policy brief by child development study Growing Up in New Zealand.
  • Private rentals less safe for raising toddlers
    15 January 2015
    Many private rentals fall short of being safe places to bring up a child suggests new research into household safety released by Growing Up in New Zealand.
  • Study on skin infection in children gets funding boost
    16 December 2014
    Dr Mark Hobbs from the Centre for Longitudinal Research has been awarded a grant from the Auckland Medical Research Foundation to determine the relative contribution of social, economic, ethnic, environmental, genetic and microbiological factors to the incidence of serious skin and soft tissue infections in children under five.