Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences


Upcoming Tōmaiora seminar


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Dr Donna Cormack and Dr Ricci Harris

Racial/Ethnic Bias and Clinical Decision-Making in Medicine: a study of New Zealand medical students.

 

Tuesday 19th September, 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm. 

Function Room 730-220, Level 2, School of Population Health, Tāmaki Campus.

 

Dr Donna Cormack (Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Mamoe) is a researcher with academic positions at the University of Auckland and University of Otago. She has a focus on the measurement and conceptualisation of ethnicity, Māori health inequities and racism as a health determinant.

Dr Ricci Harris (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngai Tahu) is a public health physician and senior research fellow. She holds academic positions at the University of Auckland and the University of Otago. Her research focuses on broad determinants of Māori health and ethnic inequities, particularly the role of racism as a fundamental driver of ethnic inequities.

Abstract:

Evidence that health provider racial/ethnic bias may contribute to ethnic health inequities is increasing internationally. However, there is limited research examining racial/ethnic bias among medical students or in relation to indigenous peoples. Understanding medical student racial/ethnic bias is important in order to improve teaching and learning environments, promote resources to aid students to mitigate racial/ethnic bias in their future practice, and to contribute more broadly to the goals of improving indigenous health and eliminating racism. This seminar will present findings from a study of final year New Zealand medical students that measured implicit and explicit racial/ethnic bias (in relation to Māori and NZ Europeans) and relationships to clinical decision-making. It will also discuss potential interventions and actions to mitigate and reduce bias.

Biscuits, coffee and tea will be provided.

The free visitor’s car park is accessed via the main entrance at gate 1. 
For a map of the Tāmaki Innovation Campus please visit the following link: http://web.env.auckland.ac.nz/public/maps/tamaki.pdf

Māhina 2017 Poster Presentations

 

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Lauren White
Poster (393.5 kB, PDF)
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Santino Camacho
Presentation (881.3 kB, PDF)
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Sai Furukawa
Presentation (1.1 MB, PDF)
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Hoʻoleia Kaeo
Presentation (456.6 kB, PDF)
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Keith Allen Afong
Presentation (146.6 kB, PDF)
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Jo Ann Tuifanu
Presentation (484.9 kB, PDF)

Dr Daniel Exeter

Using big data to explore the geography of health and deprivation in Aotearoa.

Tuesday 20th June, 2017, 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

Function Room 730-220, Level 2, School of Population Health, Tāmaki Campus

 

Dr Daniel Exeter is a Senior Lecturer in Epidemiology at the University of Auckland. He is a quantitative health geographer and has a background in Geographical Information Systems and spatial analysis. Using large datasets such as the census and the IDI, his research aims to identify, and provide solutions to inequities in health. He is currently leading research to deliver a new measure of neighbourhood deprivation in NZ, and measures of socioeconomic position among the elderly. He is a co-investigator on the HRC-VIEW programme of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction research, where he uses big data to investigate the geographical variations in treatment, outcomes and CVD-related service utilisation.

 

Abstracts:

 

The Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) is a large research database containing microdata about people and households, providing unprecedented opportunities for health and social research. After a brief introduction to the IDI, we demonstrate the construction of the “VIEW-IDI” population – the largest and most comprehensive individual level population cohort possible – for Census day 2013. We calculate the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by age, sex, ethnicity and DHB for this cohort and draw comparisons with two commonly used population denominators, the Health Service Utilisation (HSU) population and the usually-resident population who completed the 2013 Census.

In addition, we describe the development of the Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD), a deprivation index developed using 28 different indicators representing 7 Domains of deprivation, from administrative data sources in New Zealand. Using B4School Check data, we reveal a comprehensive understanding of the deprivation/childhood obesity relationship in NZ.

We close this presentation with a discussion of the benefits and risks of using big data to inform health and social policy in Aotearoa.

Biscuits, coffee and tea will be provided.

 

Dr Jennifer Reid

Oral Health and Diabetes

Tuesday 16th May, 12:30 pm to 1:30 pm

Function Room 730-220, Level 2, School of Population Health, Tāmaki Campus.

 

Dr Jennifer Reid (Te Rarawa) is a health sociologist awarded a HRC post-doctoral fellowship in 2015, to conduct research in Whangaroa, Te Tai Tokerau, where she currently resides.  Past equity-focused research examined barriers to primary health care for Māori (PhD) and barriers to Māori student success at Canterbury University (MA). Jennifer is interested in racism in NZ society and taught a course on Te Tiriti o Waitangi for 7 years at Canterbury University.

 

Abstract: The health system is a critical, yet rarely investigated, determinant of health among the high-deprivation, high- density Māori population in Whangaroa. Exploring complexities impacting on the lives of Māori adults (n=27) with poorly managed T2DM highlighted two areas readily amenable to change.  First, oral health.  The community lacked accessible and affordable oral and dental healthcare, local dentists or fluoridated water. Given the bidirectional relationship between T2DM and periodontitis, the results suggested that oral health should be integrated into Diabetes Annual Reviews, with subsidized specialist referrals for oral health examinations and treatment of periodontitis; as well as denture stomatitis and maintenance.  Second, gestational diabetes (GDM).  GDM is readily identifiable, preventable and treatable, yet sixty per cent of women with diabetes-in-pregnancy (n=10) report diagnosed diabetes in their offspring (primarily female of reproductive age). Our findings point to a transgenerational cycle of GDM, and its impact.  Further we argue that the health sector must intervene to prevent, halt or at least slow the progression of gestational diabetes to T2DM in Māori communities.  This presentation will present findings and recommendations including potential interventions to advance indigenous health gain and achieve health equity.

 Biscuits, coffee and tea will be provided.

The free visitor’s car park is accessed via the main entrance at gate 1.  

For a map of the Tāmaki Innovation Campus please visit the following link: http://web.env.auckland.ac.nz/public/maps/tamaki.pdf

Tōmaiora seminars

Click on the year to view a full listing of previous Tōmaiora seminars, including information about presenter and their presentation.

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012