Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences


POPLHLTH 206 - Life Cycle Nutrition

 

15 Points

Semester 1

Tāmaki

 

Description


Provides students with a general background and introduction to: the New Zealand diet; food preparation and meal patterns; dietary requirements during pregnancy and lactation, childhood and adolescence, lifestyle changes, maturity and ageing.

Course Outline


This course provides students with a general background and introduction to the study of public health nutrition including an introduction to the nutrients, major nutritional issues across the lifecycle, and current threats to the nutritional wellbeing of New Zealanders.

Key Course Objectives


By the conclusion of the course, each participant will be able to:

  1. Describe the principal research methods used to study the relationship between nutrition and health and the limitations of those methods
    2. Evaluate how nutrition research is translated into dietary advice
    3. Identify nutrients required for human health, amounts needed, major food sources and main functions in the body
    4. Describe the major nutrition issues affecting the population and across the lifecycle stages
    5. Critically evaluate food labels and other sources of nutritional information
    6. Critically evaluate the diets of individuals and the dietary patterns of population groups
    7. Describe contemporary issues in public health nutrition and their impact on population health
     

Course Structure


There are two one hour lectures and a one hour tutorial each week.

 

Lecture 

 

Week

Topic

Related Objectives

1

Introduction to course

1,2

2

Translating nutrition research into nutrition advice

1,2

3

Macronutrients, part 1

3

4

Macronutrients, part 2

3

5

Macronutrients, part 3

3

6

Vitamin D

3

7

Vitamins A, E, & K

3

8

Vitamins B & C

3

9

Minerals Ca, Na, K

3

10

Physical activity

4, 7

11

Dietary assessment

1, 2

12

Class Test

 

13

Public Holiday – Anzac day

 

14

Nutrition for growth

4, 6

15

Nutrition in pregnancy

4, 6

16

Debate around folic acid

4, 7

17

Nutrition in infancy

4, 6

18

Nutritional issues for children

4, 6

19

Nutritional issues for adolescents

4,

20

Nutrition in ageing

4, 6

21

Deciphering information on food packages

5

22

Allergies

7

23

Public holiday – Queens birthday

 

24

Sports nutrition

7

 

Tutorial Schedule 

Week

Topic

1

No tutorial

2

Anthropometry

3

Introduction to FoodWorks software

4

Water

5

Sugar in drinks & critical review of a research paper

6

Semester break

7

Supported time to work on assignments in computer lab

8

No tutorial - Public holiday but computer labs booked for two days this week to work on assignments

9

Fad diets and which diet is best for health?

10

Snack bars

11

Understanding food packages

12

Food marketing

13

No tutorial – public holiday

Course Assessment


25%  Class test

40%  Food record assignment

35%  Final Exam

 

Food record assignment

In this assignment you will keep a diary of all the food and beverages you consume over a 3 day period. You will analyse the nutritional adequacy of your diet using the FoodWorks software. Access to the software will be provided during at least two tutorial sessions. You will identify key areas for improvement in your diet and explore ways to improve your current eating habits. This assignment is worth 40% of your final grade. The specific details for completing the assignment will be discussed in class. 

Readings or Recommended Textbooks


A list of recommended readings is given for each session. Students will be expected to have read these prior to the sessions, and to be prepared to discuss the issues and questions arising from them.

Prescribed Readings

  • Wardlaw, G. Wardlaw’s Nutrition: Australia and New Zealand. Australia: McGraw Hill, 2013
  • There are also prescribed readings assigned to each lecture.

Other useful reference texts

  • Nestle M.  What to Eat.  New York:  North Point Press (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), 2006
  • Willett WC.  Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy.  New York:  Simon and Schuster, 2001

 

Students are also expected to be familiar with the following references, though not specifically listed as required readings: 

National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia) and Ministry of Health (New Zealand). Nutrient Reference Values for Australia and New Zealand: Executive Summary. September 2005. Available at: http://www.moh.govt.nz/moh.nsf/pagesmh/4678

Ministry of Health. NZ Food, NZ Children. Findings of the 2002 National Children’s Nutrition Survey. November 2003. Available at: http://www.moh.govt.nz/notebook/nbbooks.nsf/0/658D849A2BAC7421CC256DD9006C C7EC/$file/nzfoodnzchildren.pdf

Ministry of Health. A Focus on Nutrition. Key findings from the 2008/09 NZ Adult Nutrition Survey. 2011. Available at: http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/focus- nutrition-key-findings-2008-09-nz-adult-nutrition-survey

Ministry of Health. Food and Nutrition Guidelines for Healthy Adults: A Background Paper. October 2003 Available at: http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/food-and-nutrition-guidelines-healthy-adults- background-paper 

Ministry of Health. New Zealand Health Survey:  Annual update of key findings 2012/13. 2013. (Sections on Health Status, health behaviours and risk factors and Health Conditions for adults and children, starting pages 5 and 38). Available at: http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/new-zealand-health-survey-annual-update-key- findings-2012-13

Diet, Nutrition and the Prevention of Chronic Diseases, WHO Technical Report 916, WHO, Geneva 2003 (Recommendations on page 56) Available at: http://whqlibdoc.who.int/trs/who_trs_916.pdf

Global action plan for the prevention and control of NCDs 2013-2020, WHO, Geneva 2013 (Voluntary Global Targets on page 5) Available at: http://www.who.int/nmh/publications/ncd-action-plan/en/ 

Course Director