Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences


POPLHLTH 776 - Population Health in Practice


15 points

Semester 1, Semester 2

Tāmaki

Description


Students will apply population health concepts, principles and methodologies from formal course work to current public health problems, and develop skills in communicating their solutions to a range of diverse audiences, while critically reflecting on their own position.

Programme and course advice


This course will facilitate the integration of prior learning and apply it to real-world case studies involving people in public health roles. It assumes the student is already familiar with core public health understandings, such as the relationship between social and environmental factors and public health, the application of theories in public health to a range of health practices and contexts, and their own role in giving voice to, and advocating for, health equity.

This course is a core course for the Postgraduate Diploma in Public Health.

Requisites


Pre-requisites: Must have completed at least 45 points from the PG Diploma in Public Health or MPH Schedule.

Learning and teaching


Goals of the course

There are four overarching goals of this course:

  1. Application and integration: To apply public health approaches to interrogate structural determinants and influences on the health of populations; apply epidemiological, biostatistical and other appropriate approaches to public health issues and to the measurement and monitoring of health status; apply theory, analysis, research and creativity to explore solutions to complex public health problems including ways to influence public policy; apply systematic approaches to reduce health inequities; apply public health practices that reflect understanding of Māori world views and the historic and contemporary place of the Treaty of Waitangi in Aotearoa New Zealand.
  2. Contesting and critiquing: To contest ideas and critically appraise and synthesise evidence from a range of sources and critique one’s own social, cultural and professional views, understandings and actions, recognising the implications they have for public health and professional practice.
  3. Communicating: To be able to select from appropriate modes, styles, formats and technologies to communicate complex theoretical ideas and health research findings to a variety of intended population groups
  4. Credibility: To initiate and undertake sustained and active inquiry in order to formulate a credible stance.

Learning outcomes

After successful completion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the application of public health principles to specific health issues
  2. Explore in-depth one important public health issue, drawing on appropriate frameworks and public health tools
  3. Evaluate, using robust methods, responses to an important public health issue
  4. Critically reflect on their own position and ability to problem solve and communicate solutions to a range of audiences on a major public health issue or issues

Content outline

  • Applying theory, analysis, research and creativity to explore solutions to complex public health problems including ways to influence public policy
  • Critically appraising and synthesising evidence from a range of sources, and recognising the implications they have for public health and professional practice
  • Selecting from appropriate modes, styles, formats and technologies to communicate complex theoretical ideas and health research findings to a variety of population groups.

Lectures and preparation

Five one-day classes, each from 9.00am to 3pm.

Preparatory readings/exercises prior to each class.

Classes will include lectures, class discussions, small group exercises, online communiques and tutorials.

Class size will be around 15-25 students. 

 

Campus teaching dates 

This course is held at Tāmaki Campus. Please see your timetable on SSO or Building 730 Reception noticeboard on the day for the room details.

Assessment


This course is assessed 100% on individual coursework (no examination), comprising:

  1. A briefing paper (30%)
  2. A submission (30%)
  3. A public health commentary in news media about a public health issue (25%)
  4. A recorded presentation to a lay audience, with individual reflection (15%)

Learning resources


All resource documents and links will be uploaded to CANVAS (Leaning Management System) prior to and during the course.

Course Director