Is it in our Genes? Neurological Gene Disease, Therapies and the Future Event as iCalendar

21 March 2019

6 - 8pm

Venue: AMRF Theatre Ground Floor, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences

Location: Grafton Campus

Host: Centre for Brain Research

Cost: Free. Register through Eventbrite - https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/brain-awareness-month-is-it-in-our-genes-neurological-gene-disease-therapies-and-the-future-tickets-55196211354

Contact email: sarah.j.evans@auckland.ac.nz

Website: www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/brain-awareness-month-is-it-in-our-genes-neurological-gene-disease-therapies-and-the-future-tickets-55196211354

BRNZ_Huntingtons Brain

Is it in our Genes? Neurological Gene Disease, Therapies and the Future

Join the panel discussion on Genetic Brain Diseases, part of the Brain Awareness Month programme presented by the Centre for Brain Research and the Neurological Foundation of New Zealand. The panellists will discuss recent advances in the field of genetic brain diseases including New Zealand trials for Huntington's Disease (HD).

Panellists:

Professor Russell Snell
Professor Russell Snell is a world renowned geneticist who was involved in isolating the genetics behind Huntington’s Disease (HD) and other genes such as Myotonic Dystrophy and Tuberous Sclerosis. He has a long-term interest in finding human disease genes with a focus on the molecular genetics of disease, in particular neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental diseases like Huntington’s Alzheimer’s and Autism. He develops models of disease which are used in the search for treatments.
Dr Richard Roxburgh
Associate Professor Richard Roxburgh is a neurologist at Auckland City Hospital where he has run the Neurogenetics clinic for 15 years. The emphasis in the clinic is on accurate genetic diagnosis as this may help with treatment here and now, and give patients opportunities to take part in research to find a cure for their disease. To lower the barriers to research involvement he has established both the NZ Neuromuscular Disease Registry and the Motor Neurone Disease Registry. Both of these have successfully allowed enrolment of New Zealand patients in international research. In 2017 he was  appointed Associate Professor at the University of Auckland. He is setting up at the University, the Neurogenetics Research clinic where people with these conditions can participate in research to devise treatments and cures of their diseases. He is currently PI of studies on enzyme replacement in Pompe disease and is the NZ PI for the upcoming Generation-HD study in which treatment aimed at RNA may slow the progression of Huntington's disease. 
Miriam Rodriguez
Miriam Rodrigues is a genetic counsellor working in research and with the neuromuscular disease community.
Ms Jo Dysart
Jo Dysart is a mental health nurse with ADHB. Jo has spent her career looking after and supporting those living with Huntington's Disease, both as a Clinical Nurse Specialist and as Manager for critical social support organisations the Huntington's Disease Association (Auckland). As a central part of the HD Regional Team, Jo and her colleagues visit with and provide vital clinical support to the HD community in the Auckland and Northland regions.

 

Doors will open at 6pm. Panel discussion at 6.30-7.30pm. Refreshments served afterwards in the Atrium.

If you'd like to submit a question for our panel before the event please email it to: sarah.j.evans@auckland.ac.nz

Find out about other Brain Awareness Month events being hosted during March. 

Register through Eventbrite.  Please make sure you register to avoid disappointment and to ensure we have the right numbers for catering. 

Map directions

Getting here:

The front entrance of the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences is located at 85 Park Rd, Grafton. Opposite is Auckland Hospital and the front entrance to the Domain. For those who require wheelchair or mobility access, we have limited parking available. Please contact sarah.j.evans@auckland.ac.nz to reserve.