Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences


Other research projects

Health Promotion Agency project (formerly ALAC)


Overview

Commissioned by the former Alcohol Advisory Council of New Zealand (ALAC), now the Health Promotion Agency Project, The Youth 07 report: The Health and Wellbeing of Secondary School Students in New Zealand and Young People and Alcohol (2011), reported that 10.7% of students who were current drinkers were worried sometimes or a lot about how much they drank and 12.3% had tried to cut down or give up. While there is acknowledgement that there have been positive trends towards non-drinking since the Youth ’01 report, there is strong evidence to support more direct approaches in supporting and limiting the individual and collective damage done from alcohol consumption amongst NZ youth. In response to these findings, the Health Promotion Agency Project, contracted AHRG to conduct additional research to seek further information and understanding about how best to support young people who are concerned about their drinking and/or who have tried to cut down or give up, or have successfully reduced or given up drinking alcohol. It was hoped that this research would help in the design and delivery of effective programmes and resources as well as the development of appropriate policy that supports young people who are concerned about their drinking. This research project achieved both of these goals.

Alternative Education surveys


Overview

Alternative Education (AE) is the term used in New Zealand for the system of educational provision established in 2000 for those students aged 13-15 years who have become alienated from the mainstream education system. Young people who succeed at school are more likely to grow up healthy. Conversely, young people who drop out of school prematurely are more likely to engage in risky behaviours and to have negative health and social outcomes. The goal of these studies was to identify health issues for young people in AE, and to identify potential strategies for addressing their health needs in the AE school.

Reports

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Wharekura survey


Overview

The Wharekura Health and Wellbeing Survey was conducted with Maori-language secondary schools (Wharekura) throughout the country in 2007. The entire Youth’07 questionnaire was translated into Te Reo Maori and Maori voiceovers were recorded for the computerised survey. All the information resources and publications were also translated and printed in Te Reo. Te Reo Maori speakers were recruited to work in the general Youth’07 and the Wharekura ’07 field research teams.

All 43 Wharekura in New Zealand were invited to participate and 26 (60% of those invited) took part in the survey. In the Wharekura, all students who were present and available on the day of the survey were invited to participate. In total, there were 921 Wharekura students who were eligible to participate; 677 of them were available and agreed to take part on the day of the survey in their Wharekura. Eleven students declined to participate, 113 students were unavailable due to other commitments and 109 students were absent on the day of the survey. Ten students were unable to take part due to technical issues and one student had left the school. The overall student response rate for the Wharekura Health and Wellbeing Survey was 73.5%.

Reports

There is no public report for this study. The wharekura agreed to participate in the survey only if their results were confidential to them.

However Te Ara Whakapiki includes data from the wharekura survey as well as from mainstream Māori students in 2007.

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Teen parent units survey


Overview

An anonymous computerised survey of 220 students from 19 Teen Parent Units (TPU) from throughout New Zealand was conducted in 2006. TPUs are educational facilities attached to established state secondary school providing education for teenaged learners who are pregnant or already parents. The survey used a pilot questionnaire from the University of Auckland Adolescent Health Research Group’s Youth’07 project” change to “pilot questionnaire from the AHRG’s Youth ’07 project. The results of this survey show that the majority of the TPU students are well connected to their families and felt safe and supported within the TPUs. Most TPU students reported making healthy choices during their pregnancies and having future goals. The survey has, however, highlighted areas of significant concern including mental health, nutrition, physical activity and sexual health. Over a quarter of the TPU students had significant levels of depressive symptoms, suicidal thoughts or self-harm behaviours. TPU students frequently reported skipping breakfast, eating fast food regularly, and rarely participating in exercise. Less than half of TPU students reported using a condom the last time they had sex and nearly 20% reported never using any form of contraception including condoms. The issues identified in this report are likely to have important impacts on the health and wellbeing of both teen mothers and their children. The survey results presented here provide important information for policy makers, funders, planners, providers and schools in improving the lives and wellbeing of teen mothers attending TPUs throughout New Zealand.

Reports

Please click on the link to view a copy of ‘The Health and Wellbeing of Secondary School Students attending Teen Parent Units in New Zealand’ report (PDF).

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